Volume 28, Issue 2 (5-2020)                   Avicenna J Nurs Midwifery Care 2020, 28(2): 112-126 | Back to browse issues page


XML Persian Abstract Print


Download citation:
BibTeX | RIS | EndNote | Medlars | ProCite | Reference Manager | RefWorks
Send citation to:

Khanzadeh Z, Mogaddam Tabrizi F. The Effect of Supportive Couple-Centered Counselling on Perception of Support for Spouse and Maternal Attachment in Parturients Referring to Health Centers of Urmia University of Medical Sciences in 2018-19. Avicenna J Nurs Midwifery Care. 2020; 28 (2) :112-126
URL: http://nmj.umsha.ac.ir/article-1-2087-en.html
1- Associate Professor, Department of Midwifery, Reproductive Health Research Center, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran , khanzadehza@yahoo.com
2- Master Student, Department of Midwifery, Student Research Committee, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran
Full-Text [PDF 616 kb]   (466 Downloads)     |   Abstract (HTML)  (3350 Views)
 Couple-centered counseling enhances understanding of spouse support and mother-infant attachment; Despite the routine training methods, due to the very good effect and also the creation of a very good relationship between the couple, it is recommended as a safe and efficient method.
Extended Abstract:   (199 Views)
Introduction

Pregnancy and subsequent motherhood are enjoyable and evolutionary events in the life of every woman [1] that make women undergo unwanted changes and these changes change their physical and mental needs [2]. The attachment of mother and baby is a warm, dynamic and emotional relationship between mother and baby [7] and is one of the main components of achieving maternal identity [8]. This emotional connection develops gradually over time [9]. This process begins before the baby is born and when the mother is aware of her pregnancy, and increases during pregnancy and continues until after delivery [10]. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to the factors that aggravate or reduce this issue. One of the most important factors in reducing the problems of this period is a suitable marital environment and having the emotional support of the spouse [14]. Support for those around us, defined as social support, is the understanding that the people we care about are important to us and will help us when we have a problem and make us feel good [15]. Having a sense of support from one's spouse has a positive effect on stressful issues in life and therefore has a positive effect on psychological and physical health [17]. Counseling Support for Couples-centeredness as a Short-Term Treatment Approach [29] with the aim of reducing postpartum marital conflicts by increasing couples 'communication skills and increasing spouses' support for new mothers in the postpartum period can lead to improving marital relationships, increasing the quality of mental and physical health of mothers and the attachment of mother and baby [30, 29]. The present study was designed and conducted with the aim of determining the effect of counseling on couple-centered support on understanding spousal support and mother-infant attachment in 2018-19.
 

Materials and Methods

The randomized clinical trial study was conducted in 2018-2019 in Urmia city, Iran. A group of 108 nulliparous women randomly allocated in intervention (54) and control (54) groups. The intervention group received 6 sessions of intervention based on spouse intervention and the control group received routine care. Data collection tools were personal information form, Spousal Support Perceived Questionnaire, and Maternal Baglanma Olcegi Questionnaire. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, independent t-test and paired t-test were used.


 

Results

Our results showed that the two groups were statistically similar in demographic features. According to the results, mean scores of perception of spouse support and attachment of mother and infant after counseling in intervention group were statistically significant compared with control group (P<0.05). In the intervention group, there was a statistically significant difference between the mean scores of spouse support and maternal attachment with infant before and after the intervention (P<0.05).

Table 1. Quantitative characteristics of spouse support variables and mother and infant attachment in two groups of intervention and control

P-value Control Group Intervention group Variable
M ± SD M ± SD
P=0.25 ±84.5 25.87 7.92± 26.94 Women’s age
P=0.3 6.06± 33.46 8.26± 34.17 Age of the spouse
% N % N
P=0.25 11.1 6 13.0 7 Illiterate Women's education
20.37 11 33.33 18 Diploma – High school
68.5 37 53.7 29 University
P=0.3 9.25 5 9.25 5 Illiterate Spouse education
20.37 11 33.33 18 Diploma – High school
70.37 38 57.4 31 University
P=0.52 - - 11.11 6 Yes History of a specific disease
100 54 88.88 48 No
- - 18.51 10 Diabetes
25.92 14 20.37 11 leaking amniotic fluid
37.03 20 18.51 10 Bleeding
37.03 20 42.59 23 None
P=0.53 66.66 36 68.51 37 Yes Pregnancy with planning
 
33.33 18 31.48 17 No
P=0.51 77.77 42 100 54 Yes Satisfaction with the sex of the baby
 
22.22 12 - - No
P=0.51 77.77 42 74.07 40 Yes Discomfort in the last 6 months
22.22 12 25.92 14 No
P=0.54 57.4 31 62.96 34 Yes, I am completely satisfied Satisfaction with married life
 
29.62 16 37.03 20 I am somewhat satisfied
12.96 7 - - No, I'm not satisfied
P =0.54 88.88 48 25.92 14 Rent Residence
- - 31.48 17 Organizational
11.11 6 42.59 23 Private property
 

Table 2. Comparison of the average scores of support for spouse and maternal and infant attachment after delivery in two groups of intervention and control before the intervention
Spouse support variable Spouse support scales M ± SD P-value
Emotional support Intervention group 6.6± 22.01 0.071
control group 7.17± 20.07
Instrumental support
 
Intervention group 3.11± 10.22 0.443
control group 2.84± 10.33
Information support Intervention group 2.77± 9.85 0.490
control group 2.66± 10.18
Total spouse support score Intervention group 11.51± 42.09 0.189
control group 8.94± 40.60
Mother and baby attachment variables Sub-scales of mother-infant attachment M ± SD P-value
Feeling attached or attached to the baby Intervention group 5.22± 18.07 0.324
control group 4.62± 16.88
Analysis of mothers' feelings Intervention group 4.86± 16.52 0.270
control group 4.40± 15.39
Identify the needs of the baby Intervention group 2.06± 7.41 0.521
control group 2.32± 7.52
The total score of mother and baby attachment Intervention group 11.42± 42.01 0.718
control group 10.52± 39.81
 
Table 3. Comparison of average scores of support for spouse and maternal and infant attachment after delivery in two groups of intervention and control after the intervention
Spouse support variable Variable scales for spouse support M ± SD T-test P-value
Emotional support control group 7.82± 32.33 3.12 0.017
Intervention group 5.5± 37.86
Instrumental support
 
control group 3.55± 14.7 2.75 0.01
Intervention group 2.5± 17.2
Information support control group 2.84± 11.76 1.43 0.02
Intervention group 2.00± 13.76
Total spouse support score control group 14.21± 45.55 7.3 0.04
Intervention group 10.00± 53.34
Mother and baby attachment variables Sub-scales of mother-infant attachment M ± SD T-test P-value
Feeling attached or attached to the baby control group 3.52± 30.57 2.25 0.02
Intervention group 4.21± 32.23
Analysis of mothers' feelings control group 2.29± 27.98 4.15 0.01
Intervention group 2.62± 29.96
Identify the needs of the baby control group 0.2± 9.00 3.23 0.00
Intervention group 0.9± 11.94
The total score of mother and baby attachment control group 6.01± 67.55 9.63 0.03
Intervention group 7.73± 74.13
 
Table 4. Comparison of the average overall scores of variables of spouse support and maternal and neonatal attachment after delivery in two groups of intervention and control before and after the intervention
P-value M ± SD                                                   Statistics
Variable
0.085 11.51± 42.09 Intervention group before the intervention Spouse support variable
0.085 10.01± 68.91 Intervention group after the intervention
P<0.001  8.94 ± 40.60 Control group before the intervention
P<0.001 7.99± 42.15 Control group after the intervention
 
 
 
Table 5. Comparison of the average scores of mother and infant attachment variables in the two groups of intervention and control before and after the intervention
P-value M ± SD                                             Statistics
Variable
0.001> P 11.42± 42.01 Intervention group before the intervention Mother and baby attachment variables
0.001> P 5.82± 70.36 Intervention group after the intervention
0.00 10.59± 39.81 Control group before the intervention
0.00 8.96± 41.26 Control group after the intervention

 

 

Discussion

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of couple-centered support counseling on understanding spousal support and maternal and infant attachment. There was a significant increase in counseling and training compared to couples who had not been counseled and educated [35]. In confirmation of the results of the present study in the three dimensions of understanding spousal support (emotional, informational, instrumental) in this study in the emotional dimension, we can refer to Weis's study, which concluded that in the reassuring or encouraging the person will result in cognition of the presence of a supporter [36]. Other similar studies in McKee et al. showed that the presence of a partner with a pregnant woman and hearing positive sentences from the partner about pregnancy can provide adequate emotional support for pregnancy and postpartum period [37]. According to a study by Bost et al., the greater the volume of access to support resources, the easier it will be for women to adjust to the needs of the postpartum period and how to provide them [38]. Unequivocal studies on spousal support include the study of Donnellan, Bennett, and Soulsby, which showed that spousal and family support is not always sufficient. Also, in Sabiha Yedirira's study, there was no relationship between instrumental support and information about spouse support dimensions with marital satisfaction; however, in this study, there was a relationship between emotional support of spouse and expression of marital satisfaction [43]. Other inconsistent studies included Reid and Taylor's study, which found that support was beneficial for all women, but insufficient to deal with post-labor stress [44].

 

Conclusion

The results of the present study had a positive effect on couple-centered support counseling on increasing spousal support for new mothers and increasing maternal and neonatal attachment in first-born women. Using the results of this study, researchers suggest that health workers and other members of the healthcare group who are in contact with the mothers giving birth, use this type of counseling to increase spouses' support for the new mother and promote maternal mental health and increase the mother's attachment to the newborn. Born as a simple, inexpensive, and enjoyable home-based technique, they use part-time postpartum care to take steps to improve maternal and child health.


 

Acknowledgments

This article is the result of the dissertation of the master's degree student of midwifery counseling, approved by Urmia University of Medical Sciences with the code of ethics Ir.umsu.rec.1397.275 dated 9/7/1397. Researchers hereby thank the Vice Chancellor for Research of the University, professors and other esteemed staff of the Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery, as well as the selected health and medical centers of Urmia for their sincere cooperation.

 

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

 

Type of Study: Systematic Review | Subject: Midwifery
Received: 2019/08/10 | Accepted: 2019/09/16 | Published: 2020/01/17

References
1. Cunningham F, Leveno K, Bloom S, Spong CY, Dashe J. Williams obstetrics, 24e: Mcgraw-hill; 2014.
2. Zhang H, Wu J, Norris J, Guo L, Hu Y. Predictors of preference for caesarean delivery among pregnant women in Beijing. Journal of International Medical Research. 2017;45(2):798-807. [DOI:10.1177/0300060517696217] [PMID] [PMCID]
3. Lin H-C, Xirasagar S. Maternal age and the likelihood of a maternal request for cesarean delivery: A 5-year population-based study. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2005;192(3):848-55. [DOI:10.1016/j.ajog.2004.09.133] [PMID]
4. Pirdehghan A. Evaluation and comparison of normal vaginal delivery and elective cesarean section burden in Isfahan city Iran: Isfahan; 2010.
5. Babaei F, Aghajani M, Estambolichi L, Joshari M, Mazaheri Z, Kykhosravi F, Maher A. Study of the promotion of normal delivery program in government hospitals in line with the health transformation plan and its achievements. Hakim Research Journal. 2017 Apr 10;20(1):44-53.
6. Nosratabadi M, Hekmat K, Dencker A, Abbaspoor Z. Individual and Group Psycho-Educational Counseling on Knowledge, Attitude and Preference for Birth Method in Nulliparous Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of family & reproductive health. 2018;12(2):103-10.
7. Badiee S, Ravanshad Y, Azarfar A, Dastfan F, Babayi S, Mirzayi N. Survey of Cesarean Deliveries and Their Causes in Hospitals Affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran, 2011. The Iranian Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Infertility. 2013;16(66):10-7 [persian]
8. Matinnia N, Haghighi M, Jahangard L, Ibrahim FB, Rahman HA, Ghaleiha A, et al. Further evidence of psychological factors underlying choice of elective cesarean delivery (ECD) by primigravidae. Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria. 2018;40(1):83-8. [DOI:10.1590/1516-4446-2017-2229] [PMID] [PMCID]
9. Dadipoor S, Madani A, Alavi A, Roozbeh N, Safari Moradabadi A. A survey of the growing trend of caesarian section in Iran and the world: a review article. The Iranian Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Infertility. 2016;19(27):8-17 [persian]
10. Moasheri BN, Sharifzadeh G, Soltanzadeh V, Khosravi Givshad Z, Rakhshany Zabol F. Relationship between fear of pain, fear of delivery and attitude towards cesarean section with preferred mode of delivery among pregnant women. The Iranian Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Infertility. 2016;18(179):8-16 [persian]
11. Mohammadi G, Abbasi M. Study of informed decision making in pregnant women about delivery method. Medical Ethics Journal. 2015;8(27):53-69 [persian[
12. Gamble JA, Creedy DK. Women's preference for a cesarean section: incidence and associated factors. Birth. 2001;28(2):101-10. [DOI:10.1046/j.1523-536X.2001.00101.x] [PMID]
13. Mehrbi S, Etmadi A, Borjali A, Sadipoor E. The Effect of Puberty education On Knowledge, Attiude and Function of Girls Students. Journal of Patient Safety &Quality Improvement. 2016;1(4):405-9
14. Jourabchi Z, Roshan Z, Alipour M, Ranjkesh F. Effect of Group Counseling on the Type of Delivery in Nulliparous Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Sci J Hamadan Nurs Midwifery Fac. 2018; 26 (2):120- 128:[persian[ [DOI:10.30699/sjhnmf.26.2.120]
15. faghihi A. Consultation in the mirror of science and religion: Qim: Islamic Publicatios Office, . PMCID:PMC550646. 2005.
16. Firouzi M, Ebrahimi A. Knowledge and Attitudes of Women about Preconception Care. Qom Univ Med Sci J. 2017;10(12):62-8 [persian]
17. Shahidi S, Aghdak P, Izadi M. Effect of pre-conception care protocol on women's awareness. Iranian Journal of Medical Education. 2011;10(5):525-32 [persian]
18. Rahimikian F, Mirmohamadaliei M, Mehran A, Aboozari Ghforoodi K, Salmaani Barough N. Effect of Education Designed based on Health Belief Model on Choosing Delivery Mode. Hayat. 2009;14(4):25-32 [persian]
19. Varghese S, Singh S, Kour G, Dhar T. Knowledge, attitude and preferences of pregnant women towards mode of delivery in a tertiary care center. International Journal of Research in Medical Sciences. 2016;4(10):4394-8. [DOI:10.18203/2320-6012.ijrms20163299]
20. Dogra P, Sharma R. Preferences of pregnant women regarding mode of delivery: a questionnaire based study. International Journal of Scientific Reports. 2017;3(11):292-5. [DOI:10.18203/issn.2454-2156.IntJSciRep20174870]
21. Rinehart W, Rudy S, Drennan M. GATHER guide to counseling. Population Reports Series J: Family Planning Programs. 1998(48):1-31.
22. Malakouti J, Sattarzadeh Jahdi N, Mohaddesi H, Alidoost N, Asghari Jafarabadi M, Salehi Pourmehr H. The evaluating effect of education on knowledge and attitude of nulliparous women toward the delivery method. The Journal of Urmia Nursing and Midwifery Faculty. 2014;12(7):568-75 [persian[
23. Sharifirad G, Rezaeian M, Soltani R, Javaheri S, Mazaheri MA. A survey on the effects of husbands' education of pregnant women on knowledge, attitude, and reducing elective cesarean section. Journal of Education and Health Promotion. 2013;2 [persian] [DOI:10.4103/2277-9531.119036] [PMID] [PMCID]
24. khaniMogadam R, ShojaeZadeh D, Taqdisi, Arbabizadeh H. The effect of education by community health volunteers on choice of delivery kind in pregnant women based on the Behavioral Intention Model (BIM). journal of School of Public Health and Institute of Public Health Research. 2013;10(3):27-40 [persian[
25. Devkota R, Khan G, Alam K, Sapkota B, Devkota D. Impacts of counseling on knowledge, attitude and practice of medication use during pregnancy. BMC pregnancy and childbirth. 2017;17(1):131. [DOI:10.1186/s12884-017-1316-6] [PMID] [PMCID]
26. ShahrakiSanavi F, Navidian A, Rakhshani F, Ansari-Moghaddam A. The effect of education on base the Theory of Planned Behavior toward normal delivery in pregnant women with intention elective cesarean. Hormozgan Medical Journal. 2014;17(6):531-9 [persian]
27. Abedian Z, Navaee M, Jaafari Sani H, Arani A, Ebrahimzadeh S. Comparing the Effect of two Teaching Methods, Role Playing and Lecture on Primigravida Women's Knowledge, Attitude and Performance according to Delivery Mode. The Iranian Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Infertility. 2012;15(1):26-34 [persian]
28. Pourandokht A, Mohamadzadeh L, Haghayii H. Benefits and harms of vaginal delivery and unneeded cesarean section. Behvarz J. 2012;23(1):62-4 [persian]
29. Malakouti J, Sattarzadeh Jahdi N, Mohaddesi H, Alidoost N, Asghari Jafarabadi M, Salehi Pourmehr H. The evaluating effect of education on knowledge and attitude of nulliparous women toward the delivery method. The Journal of Urmia Nursing and Midwifery Faculty. 2014;12(7):568-75 [persian[
30. Sharifirad G, Rezaeian M, Soltani R, Javaheri S, Mazaheri MA. A survey on the effects of husbands' education of pregnant women on knowledge, attitude, and reducing elective cesarean section. Journal of Education and Health Promotion. 2013;2 [persian]. [DOI:10.4103/2277-9531.119036] [PMID] [PMCID]
31. khaniMogadam R, ShojaeZadeh D, Taqdisi, Arbabizadeh H. The effect of education by community health volunteers on choice of delivery kind in pregnant women based on the Behavioral Intention Model (BIM). journal of School of Public Health and Institute of Public Health Research. 2013;10(3):27-40 [persian[
32. Devkota R, Khan G, Alam K, Sapkota B, Devkota D. Impacts of counseling on knowledge, attitude and practice of medication use during pregnancy. BMC pregnancy and childbirth. 2017;17(1):131. [DOI:10.1186/s12884-017-1316-6] [PMID] [PMCID]
33. Abedian Z, Navaee M, Jaafari Sani H, Arani A, Ebrahimzadeh S. Comparing the Effect of two Teaching Methods, Role Playing and Lecture on Primigravida Women's Knowledge, Attitude and Performance according to Delivery Mode. The Iranian Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Infertility. 2012;15(1):26-34 [persian].
34. Dadipoor S, Madani A, Alavi A, Roozbeh N, Safari Moradabadi A. A survey of the growing trend of caesarian section in Iran and the world: a review article. Iranian Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Infertility. 2016;19(27):8-17.

Add your comments about this article : Your username or Email:
CAPTCHA

Send email to the article author


Rights and permissions
Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

© 2021 CC BY-NC 4.0 | Avicenna Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Care

Designed & Developed by : Yektaweb