Volume 28, Issue 4 (Fall 2020)                   Avicenna J Nurs Midwifery Care 2020, 28(4): 9-19 | Back to browse issues page


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Oshvandi K, Masoumi S Z, Kazemi F, Shayan A, Oliaei S S, Mohammadi A. Comparison of Maternal Anemia and Their Infant Apgar Scores in Conventional Vaginal Delivery with Physiological Delivery. Avicenna J Nurs Midwifery Care 2020; 28 (4) :9-19
URL: http://nmj.umsha.ac.ir/article-1-2177-en.html
1- Professor, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
2- Associated professor, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
3- Lecturer, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
4- Lecturer, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran , arezoo.shayan2012@yahoo.com
5- Research Center of Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Hamadan Blood Center, Hamadan, Iran
Abstract:   (2826 Views)

Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare some of the maternal blood parameters and Apgar score of their infants in conventional vaginal delivery with physiological delivery.
Methods: This semi-experimental study was performed in 2018 with the participation of 400 pregnant women candidates for physiological childbirth and 400 pregnant women candidates for conventional vaginal delivery, using the available sampling method. Mothers in the physiological delivery group were those who did not receive any major labor intervention, and during the labor, training was given on how to breathe, pelvic rotation, delivery ball, hot shower, and massage. In the common vaginal delivery group, the mother went through the usual steps as soon as she was hospitalized. All mothers' intravenous blood samples were examined in two groups to measure the amount of hemoglobin and hematocrit at the time of hospitalization and 6 hours after delivery and the Apgar score of the first and fifth minutes of infancy in both groups. Data analysis was performed using Stata-13 software and the significance level was considered to be 0.05.
Results: The mean age of Hemoglobin and Hematocrit in the conventional vaginal delivery group was 27.37(5.75) years and in the physiological delivery group was 27.70 (5.73) years. The results showed that at the time of hospitalization, the mean hemoglobin in the physiological delivery group was significantly higher than the conventional vaginal delivery 11.64 (1.20) and 11.93 (1.20), respectively (P<0.001). The results showed that at the time of hospitalization, the mean hematocrit in the physiological delivery group was significantly higher than conventional vaginal delivery 36.53 (3.33) and 35.50 (3.33), respectively (P<0.001). Comparison of the Apgar scores of the newborns in two groups in the 1st and 5th minutes also showed that the Apgar score in the physiological delivery group was higher than the conventional vaginal delivery (P<0.05).
Conclusion: The results showed that at 6 hours postpartum, the mean of hemoglobin and hematocrit in the physiological delivery group was significantly higher than conventional vaginal delivery (P<0.001). Comparison of neonatal Apgar scores of the two groups in minute 1 and minute 5 also showed that the amount of Apgar score in physiological delivery group was higher than conventional vaginal delivery (P<0.05).

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✅ The results showed that at 6 hours postpartum, the mean of hemoglobin and hematocrit in the physiological delivery group was significantly higher than conventional vaginal delivery (P<0.001). Comparison of neonatal Apgar scores of the two groups in minute 1 and minute 5 also showed that the amount of Apgar score in physiological delivery group was higher than conventional vaginal delivery (P<0.05).


Type of Study: Original Research | Subject: Midwifery
Received: 2020/04/5 | Accepted: 2020/08/27 | Published: 2020/11/23

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